What Are the Five Needed Components of a Food Label?

Did you know that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires all food manufacturers to list certain information on their product labels? This includes the five needed components of a food label: the product name, net quantity, ingredients list, nutrition facts panel, and company contact information. Each of these components serves an important purpose in helping consumers make informed decisions about the foods they eat. In this blog post, we will discuss each of these components in detail and explain why they are important! Alongside we will help you to decide the best wedding water bottle labels for your events.

1. Statement of Identity

The first thing you will notice on a food label is the product name. This is known as the statement of identity and it tells you what product you are looking at. For example, if you are looking at a can of soup, the statement of identity would say “Chicken Noodle Soup.” This might seem like a no-brainer, but it is actually important for a few reasons.

● First, it helps you make sure you are looking at the right product.

● Second, it can give you an idea of what the product contains. For example, if you are looking for a vegetarian soup, then seeing “Chicken Noodle Soup” as the statement of identity would tell you that this particular soup is not what you are looking for.

>> The FDA recommends that the product name should be:
-Appropriate
-Informative
-Not misleading

>>The product name should not:
-Make false or misleading claims about the nature of the product
-Include profanity or obscene language

>>The product name must also be:
-Printed in a standard type size
-Appear on the principal display panel of the food label

2. The Net Quantity

The net quantity tells consumers how much food is actually in the package. This information is typically listed in both English and metric units, such as ounces (oz) or pounds (lb), and grams (g) or kilograms (kg). The net quantity should be listed prominently on the label so that it is easily visible to consumers.

In some cases, the net quantity may be listed as a range, such as “Net Wt. 16-oz (453g).” This means that the product actually contains between 16 and 17 ounces (between 45.28 and 48.26 grams). The FDA allows manufacturers to use ranges on food labels when it is not possible to package the exact amount of food, such as when the food is packed by weight.

>>The FDA requires that the net quantity be:
-Listed in both English and metric units
-Printed in a type size that is at least 50% as large as the largest type size used on the label
-Appear on the principal display panel or information panel of the food label

3. The Ingredients List

The ingredients list is one of the most important components of a food label, as it tells consumers what is actually in the product. The ingredients must be listed in descending order by weight, which means that the ingredient that weighs the most is listed first, and the ingredient that weighs the least is listed last.

The FDA also requires that certain ingredients be listed by their common or usual name. For example, “sugar” must be listed as “sugar” on the ingredients list, and not as “glucose syrup.” This rule is in place to help consumers understand what they are eating and to make informed decisions about the foods they purchase.

>>The FDA requires that the ingredients list be:
-Listed in descending order by weight
-Printed in a type size that is no less than 50% of the largest type size used on the label
-Appear on the information panel of the food label

4. The Nutrition Facts Panel

The nutrition facts panel (NFP) is one of the most important components of a food label, as it provides detailed information about the nutritional content of a product. The NFP must list the following information:

-Serving size
-Calories per serving
-Total fat
-Saturated fat
-Trans fat
-Cholesterol
-Sodium
-Total carbohydrate
-Dietary fiber
-Sugars
-Protein
-Vitamins and minerals

The FDA has specific requirements for the way in which this information must be presented on the label, such as the font size and placement of the NFP on the label.

>>The FDA requires that the NFP be:
-Printed in a type size that is no less than 50% of the largest type size used on the label
-Appear on the information panel of the food label
-Listed in descending order by weight
-Include the serving size and calories per serving

5. Contact Information

The contact information tells consumers who to contact if they have any questions or concerns about the product. This information typically includes the manufacturer’s or distributor’s name, address, and telephone number. In some cases, the website address may also be included.

The FDA requires that this information be listed on the food label so that consumers can easily get in touch with the company if they need to.

>>The FDA requires that the contact information be:
-Listed on the food label
-Include the manufacturer’s or distributor’s name, address, and telephone number
-May also include the website address

As you can see, there are five needed components of a food label. Each of these components serves an important purpose in helping consumers make informed decisions about the foods they purchase. When making a food label, be sure to include all of the required information so that your label is compliant with FDA regulations.

Bottle your Brand is a custom label printer, if you need help designing and printing your food labels, contact us today! We specialize in helping small businesses create custom product labels that are compliant with FDA regulations. Contact us or give us a call at 866-935-2235 to learn more about our services.